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How We Learned about Greenland Melting
Jason Box and Peter Sinclair
The accelerating melting of Greenland's ice is a very important process to understand, and this pair of explanations is an excellent start. Glaciologist Jason Box explains in a column from the Huffington Post, and film-maker Peter Sinclair illustrates with a video from the Dark Snow Project and Yale Climate Connections.
(7 minutes, August 2015)

Elegy for the Arctic
Ludovico Einaudi
A haunting piano piece played afloat among chunks of ice and in sight and sound of calving glaciers. Organized by Greenpeace.
(3 minutes, June 2015)

"Chasing Ice" Captures Largest Glacier Calving Ever Filmed
What does it look and sound like when a truly enormous chunk of glacier breaks off? Watch and listen in this short "official video" clip from "Chasing Ice," the powerful film that tells the story of photographer James Balog's ongoing ice-melt documentation project.
(5 minutes)

Hunting for Methane
Katey Walter Anthony, University of Alaska Fairbanks
A startling short video of methane bubbles becoming pillars of flame-illustrating how permafrost thaws, trees fall into lakes, and methane forms underwater, then escapes into the air, where it works as a potent greenhouse gas.
(2 minutes, January 2010)

longer
Art and Science: Time Lapse Proof of Extreme Ice Loss
James Balog
Excellent short Ted Talk by photographer James Balog, who speaks here of the importance of combining science with art, and who shows and comments on some of his jaw-dropping time-lapse footage of retreating glaciers in several parts of the world, with vivid illustrations of the scale of these changes.
(20 minutes, 2009)

Climate Change and the Literary Imagination: Creative Nonfiction *
Marybeth Holleman, Anchorage, Alaska
What do writers and artists do when they tackle the topic of climate change? In this talk and reading, writer Holleman addresses this question by focusing on what's happening to polar bears as the Far North warms: the facts, yes, but also the way their stories make us feel and challenge the ways we make sense of our world.
(25 minutes, November 2008)

Effects of Climate Change on Societies and People *
Kathleen A. Galvin, Department of Anthropology, Colorado State University
How will climate change impact people around the world? Anthropologist Galvin looks at what we know, why we should care, and how we know it with a focus on the Arctic and Africa.
(23 minutes, October 2007)


READ
books
articles & essays
Six Experts to Watch on Arctic Sea Ice
Eline Gordts and Hannah Hoag, Arctic Deeply, July 2016
If you are interested in what's happening with Arctic sea ice (and thus many other physical, biological, and cultural changes in the Arctic), here are short sketches with links of six scientists who focus on this subject.

Abrupt Sea Level Rise Looms as Increasingly Realistic Threat
Nicola Jones, Environment 360, May 2016
Despite the title, this good piece is largely about what is happening to the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica and about what we do and don't yet understand about the processes of melting there.

Scientists are Watching in Horror as Ice Collapses
Douglas Fox, National Geographic, April 2016
A vivid story about what happens when ice shelves collapse in Antarctica.

On Thin Ice: Big Northern Lakes Are Being Rapidly Transformed
Cheryl Katz, Yale Environment 360, November 2015
With key examples including Lakes Baikal, Superior, and Tahoe, this piece looks at what is happening to large, cold-water lakes around the northern hemisphere as the climate warms.

The Secrets in Greenland's Ice Sheets
Jon Gertner, New York Times Magazine, November 2015
A compelling and crystal-clear story about what scientists know, think they might know, and are trying hard to figure out about the timing and pace of future melting of Earth's giant ice sheets‒and the sea-level rise that will follow.

'Incredible' Rate of Polar Ice Loss Alarms Scientists
Robin McKie, The Guardian/The Observer, August 2014
A brief but informative account of a recent study of ice volume loss in Greenland and Antarctica‒just one instance of unsettling information that new studies seem to be consolidating.

Dark Snow: From the Arctic to the Himalayas, the Phenomenon that is Accelerating Glacier Melting
John Vidal, The Observer, July 2014
"Dust from bare soil, soot from fires and ultra-fine particles of 'black carbon' from industry and diesel engines" are being blown onto snow all over the world. The darker surfaces melt more quickly, setting up the vicious cycle of melting, darkening, warming, melting, and on and on. Good story with links to primary research and leading researchers.

Northern Mystery: Why Are Birds of the Arctic in Decline?
Ed Struzik, Environment 360, January 2014
Thick-billed murres, gyrfalcons, peregrine falcons, will and rock ptarmigans, long-tailed jaegers, Ross's and ivory gulls, and other birds are in decline, for a variety of reasons, some of them connected to climate change. Along the west coast of Hudson Bay, for instance, heavy rains have drowned peregrine chicks and caused them to die of hypothermia.

Antarctica and the Arctic: A Polar Primer for the New Great Game
Douglas Fox, Christian Science Monitor, January 2014
A very interesting and thorough story about some of the changes occurring and expected in the far north and south as more ice melts‒not ecological changes, in this case, but matters of business, economics, and politics, mostly linked to resource extraction.

10 Key Findings from a Rapidly Acidifying Arctic Ocean
Julia Whitty, Mother Jones, May 2013
A primer based on the Arctic Ocean Acidification Assessment from the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP). Click here for the report's Summary for Policy Makers.

Melting Ice Opens Fight Over Sea Routes for Arctic Debate
Flavia Krause-Jackson and Nicole Gaouette, Bloomberg, May 2013
Some of the ramifications of the opening of arctic waters for trade routes, resource mining, national security, and other important topics.

Arctic Blog: As Climate Warms, A Shifting Landscape for Wildlife
Steve Zack, Wildlife Conservation Society, August 2011, Yale e360
An eloquent overview from the field of changes underway for insects, birds, foxes, muskoxen, and other denizens of the Far North.

Climate Change Forcing Buried Toxics Back Into Atmosphere
Katherine Bagley, InsideClimate News, July 2011
As Arctic ice sea ice melts, buried POPs‒persistent organic pollutants, including PCBs and DDT‒are being re-released into the environment, with potentially worldwide ripple effects, including serious harm to wildlife and humans.

Barrow, Alaska: Ground Zero for Climate Change
Bob Reiss, Smithsonian, March 2010
An efficient overview of what Inupiat elders and hunters, scientists in various fields, and even the U.S. Coast Guard are learning about by watching the many changes occurring now along Alaska's north coast.

websites
Pan Inuit Trails Project
Created from 18th and 19th century maps and records and traditional Inuit knowledge, this interactive database recording human presence in the Northwest Passage is primarily historical but also to a significant degree current. One aim of the project is to "help people visualize how many people are being affected by climate change" in this part of the world. For a good story about the project, by Henry Gass of ClimateWire (june 2014), click here.

Arctic Sea Ice News & Analysis
National Snow & Ice Data Center
Frequently updated images, data, and explanations of Arctic sea ice conditions. Includes "Icelights: Your Burning Questions about Ice and Climate".

Extreme Ice Survey
In his Extreme Ice Survey, photographer James Balog is creating a stunning array of still, time-lapse, and video images of glaciers around the world. Enacting the motto "Seeing is Believing," Balog and his team invite visitors to the project's excellent website to see for themselves both what is happening to glaciers today and what kinds of beauty they give to our world. This work brings together the powers of art and of science to illuminate our situation and urge action.

Cape Farewell Project
Led by artist David Buckland, this London-based project sponsors creative cultural responses to climate change, taking visual artists, writers, and young people on expeditions to the arctic and creating art exhibitions and performances. In their words: "Using creativity to innovate, we engage artists for their ability to evolve and amplify a creative language, communicating on a human scale the urgency of the global climate challenge." Their website offers expedition blogs, images, and more.


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